Skip to main content
  • Print this page
  • Increase/decrease the size of the text
    • Allergy & Immunology
    • Anesthesiology
    • Bariatric Surgery
    • Cardiology (IM)
    • Certified Nurse Midwife
    • Colon & Rectal Surgery
    • Critical Care Medicine
    • Dentistry
    • Dermatology
    • Emergency Medicine
    • Endocrinology&Metabolism (IM)
    • Endodontics
    • Family Medicine
    • Family Medicine (Sports Medicine)
    • Female Pelvic Medicine
    • Gastroenterology (IM)
    • Genetics
    • Geriatrics (Family Medicine)
    • Geriatrics (Internal Medicine)
    • Geristric Psychiatry
    • Gynecologic Oncology (OB/GYN)
    • Hand Surgery (Orthopedic Surg)
    • Hematology-Oncology (IM)
    • Hospitalist
    • Infectious Disease (IM)
    • Internal Medicine
    • Interventional Cardiology
    • Maternal-Fetal Med (OB/GYN)
    • Natl Cert Bd Perioperative Nursing (CNOR)
    • Neonatal-Perinatal Med (Peds)
    • Nephrology (Internal Medicine)
    • Neurology
    • Neuropsychology
    • Neurosurgery
    • Nuclear Cardiology
    • Nurse Practitioner
    • Nurse Practitioner (Adult)
    • Nurse Practitioner (Peds)
    • Obstetrics & Gynecology
    • Occupational Medicine
    • Ophthalmology
    • Optometrists
    • Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery
    • Orthodontics
    • Orthopaedic Surgery
    • Otolaryngology
    • Pain Management
    • Pain Mgmnt (Anesthesiology)
    • Pathology
    • Pediatric Cardiology
    • Pediatric Critical Care Med
    • Pediatric Dentistry
    • Pediatric Dermatology
    • Pediatric Emergency Medicine
    • Pediatric Endocrinology
    • Pediatric Gastroenterology
    • Pediatric Hematology-Oncology
    • Pediatric Neurology
    • Pediatric Pulmonology
    • Pediatric Surgery
    • Pediatrics
    • Periodontics
    • Physical Medicine & Rehab
    • Physician Assistant
    • Plastic Surgery
    • Podiatry
    • Prosthodontics
    • Psychiatry
    • Psychology
    • Pulmonary Medicine (IM)
    • Radiation Oncology
    • Radiology
    • Reproductive Endocrin (OB/GYN)
    • Rheumatology (IM)
    • Sleep Medicine
    • Spine Surgery
    • Surgery
    • Thoracic Surgery
    • Urology
    • Vascular (Gnrl Surgery)
    Find a Doctor

Publications

Top four reasons not to delay hernia surgery

Bookmark and Share A hernia is a weakness in the muscular wall through which an organ such as the bowel may protrude. According to Miguel DeLeon, MD, of Virtua Surgical Group, it's important not to delay the repair. While repairs require surgery, the risks of leaving a hernia unattended are far too great to ignore. Here's a look at Dr. DeLeon's top four reasons not to delay hernia surgery:
  1. The longer a patient puts off surgery, the greater the potential for complications. If the intestines get caught within the ring of the abdominal weakness or defect and is not pushed back into the abdominal cavity, the intestines can become strangulated and can die due to the loss of blood supply. A hernia can also cause an obstruction in the intestines, preventing normal digestion. Such complications require emergency surgery.

  2. Over time, continuous pressure from the organ can enlarge the weak point in the muscular wall and make it more difficult to operate.

  3. The longer the hernia goes unattended, the more symptoms the patient is likely to experience. Symptoms range from pain to extreme bulges at the site of the hernia, preventing the patient from daily activity and fitting into his/her clothing.

  4. The larger the hernia the longer the recovery. Most people delay the surgery because of its inconvenience to their life; however, they're actually making it worse. What's more, minimally invasive surgery allows shorter recovery than in the past.