Arthritis & Autoimmune Disorders

Arthritis

Manage Pain, Move More Easily 

Arthritis affects your joints, but it doesn’t have to affect your whole life. When you have arthritis, your joints become inflamed, swollen and painful. Depending on the joints that are affected, you may have trouble walking, cleaning your house, or doing the fun activities that you used to enjoy. Arthritis can even rob you of a good night’s sleep. However, doctors can provide pain relief, improve mobility and limit the damage to your joints.

Our rheumatologists and orthopedic specialists are skilled in diagnosing and treating arthritis. And because arthritis can affect other parts of your body, these doctors work hand-in-hand with primary care physicians and other specialists to help ensure that all your health needs are met.

If surgery is necessary to treat damaged joints, we offer board-certified surgeons who perform thousands of joint replacements, such as hip and knee replacements, each year. We also offer rehabilitation services, including physical and occupational therapy.

To learn more about Virtua’s arthritis services, call 1-888-VIRTUA-3.

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